Guest’s Book Tour: Charlie Tyler

Welcome to my guest page. Here, every few days, I’ll be sharing a conversation, over tea and cakes, or maybe a glass of something stronger, if they are not driving, with a friend about their work in progress, or latest book release. I’ll be talking to all sort of writers and authors at different levels of their writing careers.

Photo by Artem Beliaikin on Pexels.com

Welcome to my guest page, Charlie. I’m so pleased you found the clubhouse tearooms okay. I ordered you a lager, hope it is chilled enough. Please can I start by asking you when you first begun your writing journey what drew you to your chosen genre? 

I’d written quite a few books before I got published and one of them was a romance, but I always feel most comfortable when writing with a slightly dark edge.  It’s like I’m painting a rainbow, but have to sneak a line of black underneath the violet!

The Fabulous Charlie Tyler

What writing elements do you think is your strongest points, and what would you like to do better?

I think my strongest point is my scene setting.  I have a keen sense of writing the visuals in detail, but maybe it’s also my weakest point – sometimes I think I overdo it and it slows down the action.

Tell us a little about latest writing project.  Is it a new idea, or one you have been mulling over for some time?

My new writing project is about two bodies, discovered at the bottom of an oubliette within the grounds of a girls’ boarding school.  Everyone within the school thinks they know what happened and are keeping quiet, so the police have to send in an undercover detective to fathom out how the bodies got there and why.  It’s an idea I’ve had for a while, but I’ve drawn on some of my earlier unpublished works to steal the settings and also one of the deaths! 

How many unfinished projects do you have on your computer?

None.I can’t help myself!  I have to finish what I started and that goes for reading books too; even if I hate it, I’ll finish it!

Do you write a synopsis first or write the first chapter? (If you only write short stories, or play do you plan your story, or let the characters lead you.)

I’ll write a very rough outline which I suppose vaguely resembles a synopsis, then I’ll go straight into the first chapter and carry on until I finish, referring to and changing the outline notes as I go along.  I only write a ‘proper’ synopsis when the book is finished.

Charlie’s Fantastic book cover. It’s a great read too.

When reading your work through do you ever find that your daily mood swings are reflected in your writing?

I think it’s the other way around.  The novel I wrote before The Cry of the Lake was very, very dark.  During the working week (pre-Covid), I spend a lot of time on my own and whilst writing that particular novel, it was as though a cloud of gloom had settled over me.  As soon as I finished it, the cloud disappeared. 

What did you learn when writing your book (story, play)? In writing it, how much research did you do?

I did quite a lot of research into how trauma affects the brain and the importance of the reptilian part of the brain; the oldest part, which deals with fight or flight.I also read about treatments, which bury difficult memories within the minduntil the patient is feeling strong enough to deal with them.

How many hours in a day do you write?

On a good day, I get to my desk by 7.30am and write for a couple of hours.  After that I have to deal with what’s going on in the real world.  If I don’t have anything to do in the afternoon, I might do a bit of editing, but normally I don’t have the time.

Did you ever consider writing under a pseudonym?

I did when I was writing romance because I always knew I wanted to write thrillers as well and I didn’t want to confuse my audience.  My romantic fiction name was Kitty Stone because at the time I started my romance story I was in hospital having a kidney stone removed.

What was your hardest scene to write?

The hardest scene to write was the final childhood encounter between Grace and Frank – it left me feeling quite emotionally drained.


Link to book is https://mybook.to./thecryofthelake 

Link to website is https://www.charlietyler.com 

Thank you so much for joining me here today. I look forward to having you join me here again, Charlie.

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