Clubhouse Chat Guest: Sean P Chatterton

Welcome to Clubhouse Chat page. For those of you who are not a member won’t be aware that the location of the Clubhouse is shrouded in mystery. The only way to visit the clubhouse is via membership or an invite to the clubhouse tearoom. Every few days, I’ll be sharing a conversation I’ve had with a guest over tea and cakes, or maybe a glass of something stronger, about their work in progress, or latest book release. I’ll be talking to all sort of writers and authors at different levels of their writing careers.

Photo by Jason Villanueva on Pexels.com

This morning in the clubhouse I’m chatting with Sean. Welcome Sean.

Good Morning Paula.

Now we have our drinks I can start by asking you when you first began  your writing journey what drew you to your chosen genre?

I write in the genres that I read, If I have a story that fits a particular genre, then it goes there. If another genre, then it goes there instead. I’ve written SF, Ghost stories, slip stream and YA. I tend to prefer writing SF, but amazingly my ghost and super natural stories have had a far better reception. One I even had another writer message me to say that was the best short story that he had read that year. High praise indeed.


What writing elements do you think is your strongest points, and what would you like to do better?

Sean P Chatterton

Strongest point? Wish I knew. I would like to think my strong point is that the stories leave you thinking long after you had finished reading the story. The only thing I know I need to do better is sit down and write more!

Tell us a little about latest writing project.  Is it a new idea, or one you have been mulling over for some time?

I have at least a handful of writing projects on the go. Partly because of the way I write, and partly because I have an idea that I need to get down. I currently have five books mapped out, but only written a bit of each one. I do tend to flit between one thing and another. Lack of concentration? Or plain laziness I’m not sure.

How many unfinished projects do you have on your computer?

Too many! I need to find the time, be more disciplined, concentrate more. Magic fairy dust or something just to finish each book / story. But as a number, five books and over twenty short stories.



Do you plan your short stories, or let the characters lead you?

I tend to be a bit of a seat of the pants writer. I like to discover the story as I write it. So I’m part reader as well as a writer. That said, when writing some stories I kinda need to know where it is going so that I can write the story. But like JRR Tolkien and Faramir, characters can just turn up!

Choosing only five of your favourite authors and  can you list them in order 1 begin the top of your list and say how have they influenced your writing?

This would be a very long answer so I’ll skip this one.

When reading your work through do you ever find that your daily mood swings are reflected in your writing?

No. When writing properly I have a writing head on and that’s it. I did find once that I managed to find lyrics to a song in one of my stories which was on one of my Youtube playlists, so perhaps…

Were any of your characters inspired by real people?

Not really. But I do include snippets, like say a green cardigan, or an incident that I heard about.

What did you learn when writing your book story? In writing it, how much research did you do?

No book written yet. Research varies from none at all, to hours spent confirming a bit of technical data.

Is there anything about you your readers might be surprised to find out?

Now where do I start. I also write under a female pen name. Been doing karate for 31 years. I’m probably older than their parents…



Did you uncover things about yourself while writing your stories whether that be a long forgotten memory, a positive experience etc.

Nah

What is your work schedule like when you’re writing?

I don’t schedule.

Do you set yourself a daily word count? 

Tried that, then was constantly beating myself up for not reaching the daily target. So I binned the idea.

How many hours in a day do you write?

For work, eight or more. For pleasure, more like hours a week…

Did you ever consider writing under a pseudonym?

Insert evil smiley. More wine darlings?



How do you select the names of your characters? Do you know everything about them before you start writing their story?

I tend to grab these out of thin air, or a the first name I see when browsing Facebook.

What was your hardest scene to write?

Not a specific one. But when I map out a story and I have no inspiration but there is a scene required to bridge a gap or join other scenes up, this can be a bit of a churn to write that scene.

How long on average does it take you to write a story?

My current record is nearly four decades. Does that count? I started writing a book when I was a teenager. It is still uncompleted and largely what I have written is in draft mode. Short stories on the other hand. My longest short story took a little over two years to complete. The quickest, two hours

Thank you for joining me in the tearoom, Sean.

Thank you for invite me, Paula

To find out more about Sean’s work check out his website.

It you want to find out more about Clubhouse Member’s Books don’t forget to check out the Clubhouse Bookshops too.

11 thoughts on “Clubhouse Chat Guest: Sean P Chatterton

Add yours

  1. How interesting that Mr. Chatterton also writes under a female pen name. He must have some female POV characters then. I think it’s difficult to write the opposite sex, so kudos to him. From two hours to two years, that’s quite a range for writing a story! Fun chat.:-)

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Hi Sean and Paula! Great interview with Sean, a person I see off and on on Facebook but knew nothing about. Sean thanks for sharing, especially aspects of your writing process. I appreciated reading about that. Well done both of you 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Bless you, Jim for saying so. Thank you for your wonderful review. I’m hoping the the free download weekend might help to promote the book and bring in more reviews. The marketing aspects of writing is very difficult. You just don’t know what to do for the best.

      Like

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